Wednesday, 18 March 2015 12:42

Overcome Mental Challenges

by Neil Patel @ Entreprenuer.com

Would I encourage everyone to start a business? No.

Starting a business hurts. It requires hard work. Everyone has skills and abilities, but not everyone should invest those skills and abilities in starting a business. Those who possess entrepreneurial aspirations need to know how tough it is to create a company.

The biggest challenges are not the external ones like funding, coding, technology or talent acquisition. Those challenges can be fun, as long as you view them the right way. The biggest challenges are the internal ones, like stress, fear and self-doubt. Entrepreneur and financial expert Ramit Sethi estimates that 95 percent of the barriers to success come from crippling thought processes.

You have to power through some serious mental hurdles in order to start a business and make it a success. What kind of hurdles? Here are the ones that you need to get rid of.

Related: 6 Personality Traits That Can Make You a More Trusted Entrepreneur

1. I’m not really an entrepreneur.

Let me toss out one of the most over-asked and under-answered questions on the planet: What is an entrepreneur?

Nobody knows for sure. People try to define the word -- fromgovernment organizations to columnists. We have little more than mere definitions, cobbled together by people trying to make sense of the vast entrepreneurial arena.

One of the most popular types of entrepreneur articles are the lists. You’ve read them, with titles like ”25 Characteristics of a True Entrepreneur.” These can be seriously misleading. When we crowd out would-be entrepreneurs by tightening our definition of an entrepreneur, we do a disservice to the world at large and to those entrepreneurs as individuals.

In a study from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's Academy for Entrepreneurial Leadership, researchers admitted “There is no well-defined population of entrepreneurs (due to lack of consensus on definition), so comparisons and generalizations are dangerous.” Another research project from the University of Baltimore cited multiple studies that pointed to the same truth: “A common definition of the entrepreneur remains elusive.”

If you think you’re not an entrepreneur, then you’re approaching the issue from the wrong angle. The right angle is I want to start a business...sell something, do something, invent, create, dream and grow. If you start from the “am I an entrepreneur?” question then you may accidentally disqualify yourself before you even begin.

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